How Your Kids Can Make Impressionist Art: Monet Photo Project

Do you enjoy observing nature with your kids?

Have you noticed how the light at different times of day changes the way we see colors?

Make your kids’ “impressions” of the outdoors come to life with a fun and easy art project.

In this article I’ll show you how to transform nature photos into Impressionistic works of art with a simple photo transfer technique. Head outside with your kids and take some pictures, Monet-style.

Want a simple art project that shows beauty, nature and light? Get a camera. The Monet photo project is a fun way to turn outdoor photos into impressionist art.

Why Make Impressionistic Photo Transfers?

Impressionism is a movement in painting that originated in France in the late 1800s. Most Impressionist painters focused on capturing the “impressions” of light and color outdoors.

This project includes the essence of what an Impressionist observes so you can create a fun and easy photo project with your kids, Monet-style.

To make your own Impressionistic art, you and your kids get to spend time outdoors at different times of day to observe nature in the light and take pictures of it.

It’s a great way to nurture their creativity, look at the world in a whole new way and bring out their inner artists (and yours, too!).

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How to Make a Garden Collage With Your Kids: Matisse-Inspired

Want your kids to spend more time outside?

Do the shapes and colors in nature inspire you to be creative?

Bring your outdoor inspirations inside and create an imaginative paper garden collage with your kids.

In this article I’ll introduce you to Henri Matisse and show you how to use his “painting with scissors” technique to create a garden collage made from paper cutouts that’s inspired by the real gardens you see outdoors.

Bring your outdoor inspirations inside and use Henri Matisse

Why Paint With Scissors?

When creating art, it’s important to use all of the tools and materials available to you and explore your creativity in as many ways as possible.

Like scissors.

To “paint with scissors,” a phrase coined by artist Henri Matisse, you cut out shapes, place them into a unique design and then glue them on paper. It may sound simple, but it’s a lot of fun. And the possibilities of what you can create are endless.

Try painting with scissors with your kids and see what you can create!

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Art for Kids: How to Make an Illuminated Manuscript

Do your kids like art projects and books?

Want a fun, creative activity with a bonus art history lesson to go along with it?

In this article I’ll share the fascinating history of the illuminated manuscript. Then you and your kids can create a personalized illuminated manuscript of your own.

Share the magical history of illuminated manuscripts with your kids and create a personalized illuminated manuscript of your own with this easy art project.

Why Illuminated Manuscripts?

Before the days of printing presses and mass-produced, full-color books—before the e-reader was even imagined—books were written, decorated and painted by hand, one page at a time, often by monks quietly working for hours upon hours in their monasteries.

They wrote on parchment (a stiff, flat, thin material made from animal skin that was used in ancient and medieval times as a durable writing surface) and included beautifully decorated letters, borders and important scenes, making each book a one-of-a-kind piece of ancient art.

These decorations often included radiant colors accented with gold and silver, creating a glowing, “illuminating” effect that gave these special books their name: illuminated manuscripts.

You and your kids probably don’t have the time (or the quietness) to copy entire books like the monks did, but I’ll show you a simple way to recreate the colorful, glowing, illustrated letters that fill the pages of old.

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7 Ways to Make An Art Museum Visit Fun for Kids

Do your kids race through museums with barely a glimpse at the art?

Do they spend more time in the gift shop than the galleries?

Give them a reason to stop and look, a mystery to solve, a connection to make with a masterpiece and they may start to appreciate art.

In this article I’ll show you 7 fun ways to get your kids to slow down and take a look at what’s in the art museum.

They may not become art aficionados in one visit, but they might just find something that captures their interests or inspires their imaginations.

Art museum fun: get your kids to slow down and look at what's in an art museum that will capture their interests and inspire their imaginations.

How Can I Get My Kids to Appreciate an Art Museum?

Art appreciation can be a hard sell for kids (and many grownups, too). Art is old and sometimes weird. Museums are big and quiet. How does a kid who only has 5 or 10 or a dozen years of experience in the world make a connection with something so intimidating?

The key is to get your kids somehow to own the experience of a trip to the art museum.

I’ll show you how.

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